June 19, 2014

3 Comments


ev0lution-of-stardust: North Cascades by Sarah H.



ev0lution-of-stardust:

North Cascades by Sarah H.


3 Comments

Andres
Andres

April 06, 2015

Mark, those “exceptions” are addressed in the actlrie, (though I would not put a sprinter in that list). Address flexibility naturally via a healthy nervous system and less vigorous stretching is needed even for those groups. I have professional dancers who will stand behind that, one noted in the “testimonials” on the SockDoc site.

Ana
Ana

April 04, 2015

Thanks for posting this Chris. Obviously the Top 10 list is meant to be fun, thgouh some are really taking it way too seriously. However, the points about my kids not stretching and being naturally flexible w/o stretching I feel are very valid, and very important concepts to look into. I address these in the full “Stop Stretching!” post and I replied to John’s comment there too. It’s all about WHY you have to stretch – what makes it benefit you or not. The Bozo graphic and the Top 10 list are simply meant to stir up the crowd and get them thinking about what they’re doing and why. After all – I could write the same thing about say ibuprofen and how bad that is (oh yeah, I already do that), but there are going to be plenty of people who say “it works great for me.” That’s not the point – it’s why you take it that’s the point. Same if you consume copious amts of fish oil every day to keep inflammation down – maybe you should look at the amount of vege oils or carbs in your diet. And of course the same for stretching – look at why you have to spend some time doing that every day just so you feel somewhat mobile. I’ve never seen a patient, not even one, who was not able to stretch significantly less or not at all, once they cleaned up their diet, exercised properly, and got their health problems resolved.

Aysun
Aysun

April 03, 2015

Sorry to hear of the hair nastiness, I am a nurse and also have a riuuidlocsly hard time removing the paste from my patients (I work in the newborn ICU so we don’t do many EEGs). However, I have had luck with hospital grade adhesive remover. It is made for use on skin/hair, even near wounds, so is safe to use. The problem is you still have to soak the area and then gently comb out the glue, it just helps it release. Some nurses use that junk to put bows on the babies’ heads, which ends up being a bow that lasts for weeks on end because no one wants to have to pull it off. The adhesive remover comes in little pads like alcohol wipes which would be pretty much useless for Schuyler but it also comes in a bottle of just the liquid also. You might try calling a pediatric unit in a hospital, they are usually sympathetic to this kind of thing and might be able to sneak you a bottle.

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